Debate and Forensics

Debate

Sponsor:   Carolyn Cook  

Description:  Students explore contemporary policy issues from multiple standpoints and learn to advocate for and against the implementation of policies that attempt to solve national and global problems.  Students in debate learn to cross examine, strategize, and persuasively articulate their position with focus on building skills in the areas of speaking, thinking, organization, research, and writing.  The debate team competes in tournaments around the city and state. 

Requirements:          All students in grades 9-12 are eligible for Novice Debate (first year).  Advanced Debate is an honors course that requires a weekly after school work night. Debate is a prerequisite for Honors Debate.

Meetings and Events:         Practice is held during the school day in the assigned beginning and advanced level classes. The class meets after school 2-3 nights a week for optional team work-nights. Tournaments are held on Fridays and Saturdays.

Debate Beyond High School:   Debate is about change. We are constantly engaged in a struggle to make our lives, our community, our country, our world, our future, a better one. We should never be satisfied with the way things are now-surely there is something in our lives that could be improved. Debate is that process which determines how change should come about. Debate attempts to justify changing the way we think and live. In the real world, debate occurs every day on the floor of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. Debate occurs at the United Nations, the faculty meetings at your school, and at your dining room table. The procedures for these debates may differ, but the process is the same-discussion that resolves an issue which will determine whether change is good or bad.

 

Competitive Speech and Drama (Forensics)

Sponsor:  Carolyn Cook  

Description:  Students compete in speaking and acting events.  This course offers choice: students bring stories and poetry to life through oral interpretation; write, research, and speak about the issues that matter most to them; debate about philosophy and social issues; and perform hilarious and touching drama with peers or independently.  Events include duet acting, improvisation, oral interpretation, humorous and dramatic, original oratory, extemporaneous speaking, informative speaking, duo interpretation, mock trial, Lincoln Douglas, and Public Forum Debate. 

Requirements:          All students in grades 9-12 are eligible.
Advanced Competitive Speech and Drama requires a weekly after school work night. 
Novice (first year) is a prerequisite for Honors Competitive Speech and Drama.

Meetings and Events:         SECOND SEMESTER ONLY. Practice is held during the school day in the assigned beginning and advanced level classes. The class meets after school 2-3 nights a week for optional team work-nights. Tournaments are held on Fridays and Saturdays.

Speech and Drama Beyond High School:  Navigating the complex issues posed by contemporary society and finding a voice that is both relatable and worthy of an audience is increasingly essential to individual success.  Being able to step into a character's shoes and build empathy for experiences beyond our own guides global citizens to successfully engage with others.  Relying on evidence to drive argumentation is key to confronting our most challenging social issues and promoting real change. Performance is art that informs social knowledge and understanding.  Speech is a vehicle for connecting complex ideas and action.  For all of these reasons communication skills are increasingly among the most desirable traits of today's job applicants.  Taking the time to understand your audience, harness your ideas, and find your own voice is a truly a transformational experience.

 

Mock Trial

Sponsor:  Carolyn Cook

Description:  Students explore law by examining a case and learning what it takes to try it in a courtroom.  Students work in teams comprised of peer lawyers and witnesses to prepare a prosecution and defense for a realistic court case.  This study also involves learning norms and practices of the American court system. The season culminates at an area moot court competition where students try their cases in front of real lawyers and judges at an area court house for the opportunity to advance to State and National level competition. 

Requirements:   All students in grades 9-12 are eligible.

Meetings and Events:  Practice is held during the school day in the assigned beginning and advanced level classes.  Competitions are held on Saturdays. If the team advances to State, there will be optional after school practice.